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Origins of the breed

Majority of the domestic breeds of cats, from which Maine coon, the Manx, Russian blue and the Siamese one, result from natural breeds of domestic cats originating in a specific geographical area.
Others, such as the Himalayan, are products of the Man, the result of crossings meticulous person until obtaining the desired breed.
Some relatively recent breeds, such as the Rex breeds, cats with undulated hair, Sphinx without hair, Scottish Fold with the folded ears or the American cats with curly hair, were obtained by genetic change and were developed by selection to become breeds with whole share.




NEBELUNG





ORIGIN
Although the longhaired Russian cat was exhibited in the first British cat shows over one hundred years ago, it has not been part of the cat fancy until the latter part of this century. In 1987 TICA’s Board of Directors accepted the Nebelung as longhaired Russian Blues. The breed was accepted as a new breed in the Cat Fanciers’ Federation (CFF) in 1990 and in the championship category of the Traditional Cat. The breed is quite rare and is available currently only in the United States, Germany, the Netherlands, Russia and France.



ASPECT
The Nebelung breed recreates the Russian longhair : a long body, long legs, long tail, broad shoulders and a head with flat planes : It is a slender cat with a medium-long, silky blue coat. Silver tipping on the guard hairs reflects light, giving a silvery sheen to the whole body. Their eyes are a vivid green.



CHARACTER
They are gentle and shy, but loving and attentive to their owners and family members. Like the Russian Blue, Nebelungs make affectionate, devoted companions, though they may be initially shy with strangers, particularly young children. Nebelungs may take a little extra time to adapt to new homes.



CARE
One will give it a bath / month.



PERSIAN





ORIGIN
As the dusty desert caravans wound their way westward from Persia and Iran, it is supposed that secreted among the rare spices and jewels on the basket-laden camels was an even more precious cargo, an occasional longhair cat. They were called Persian for their "country of origin"



ASPECT
Persians, with their long flowing coats and open pansy-like faces are the Number One breed in popularity. While the white Persian has long been the darling of photographers and advertisers, Persians come in an astonishing number of colors, which are divided into seven color divisions for purposes of competition. Those are:

Solid Color Divison
Silver and Golden Divison
Shaded and Smoke Divison
Tabby Divison
Particolor Divison
Bicolor Division
Himalayen Divison




CHARACTER
Their sweet, gentle, personalities blend into most households once they feel secure in their new environment. Creatures of habit, they are most at home in an atmosphere of security and serenity, but with love and reassurance, can easily adapt to the most boisterous of households. Their quiet, melodious voices are pleasant and non-abrasive. They communicate delightfully with their large expressive eyes and make charming pets for all ages. Playful but never demanding, they love to pose and will drape themselves in a favorite window or chair, enhancing the decor in much the same way as a treasured painting. Persians are tremendously responsive and become a constant source of joy and delight to their owners. Pleasurable as an unexpected sunbeam, their companionship is close and enduring.



CARE
Their long flowing coats require an indoor, protected environment. Proper maintenance requires a daily run-through with a metal comb to eliminate the potential drawbacks of tangles and hairballs. An occasional bath, attempted only after a complete comb-through and clipping of the nail tips, will keep the coat clean, healthy and beautiful. It is wise to establish the routine of the bath when they are young. However, the large eyes do mean that a certain amount of tearing is normal, and a daily face wash is recommended. With an annual trip to a trusted veterinarian, and good nutrition and care, the Persian can live as a family member for easily 15 years, and some surpassing 20 years.



AMERICAN BOBTAIL





ORIGIN
The American Bobtail breed has been in the making for thirty years, the past five of which they have grown ever more popular. It is one of the most recent breeds to be accepted for registration by the Cat Fanciers' Association. February 2000 marks this recognition and confirms what breeders have known for many years, that the American Bobtail has its place in the world of pedigreed cats. It is one of America's own, a breed to be proud of. Its wildcat look combined with its full domesticity and pleasing personality is a credit to all the breeders who have devoted the time, effort and energy into shaping this remarkable breed. The American Bobtail can proudly claim the title "Born in the USA".



ASPECT
The American Bobtail is a medium-to-large, naturally occurring, bobtailed cat. A noticeably athletic animal, well muscled, with the appearance of power. The tail should be clearly visible above the back when the cat is alert and is not to exceed the hock in length. The optimum tail is articulate and nearly straight with the slightest of curves. The American Bobtail cat possesses a strong, broad modified wedge-shaped head, with a distinctive brow above large almost almond shaped eyes giving it a natural hunting gaze. Its unique coat comes in both a medium, semi-dense shorthair and a medium-length longhair that is resilient and resistant to water. This is a slow maturing breed taking two to three years to reach full adult type. In this breed no two tails are exactly the same. The average length of the tail is one to four inches, however this is an average, and some tails may be shorter or longer.



CHARACTER
American Bobtails are a loving, kind and incredibly intelligent cats. They are noted for their dog like personalities and their devotion to their owners. They easily adapt to a busy or quiet environment.. They get along well with most dogs and have a welcome spot in their hearts for newcomers, whether they are two-legged or four-legged. Long haul truck drivers have purchased them as cabin companions because they are known to be good travellers if introduced to it at a young age. Psychotherapists have also used them in their treatment programs because they have been found to be very well-behaved and sensitive to people in distress. They are excellent companions for children They are known for their love of games and can play fetch or hide and seek for hours on end.



CARE
One will give it a bath a month followed by a brushing.



AMERICAN CURL





ORIGIN
On a typical hot June day in 1981, a stray longhaired black female cat with funny ears mooched a meal from Joe and Grace Ruga in Lakewood, California, and moved in. "Shulamith" is the original American Curl to which all bona fide pedigrees trace their origin. No one ever suspected that from that simple encounter, and the birth of some kittens 6 months later, would grow a worldwide debate about the genetics behind those unusual curled ears. Indeed, the discovery of a novel cat is an event of great importance to feline fans and fanatics, and especially true when it is inherently born to radiate well-being and good things to all fortunate enough to hold one. When selective breeding began in 1983, fanciers bred the American Curl with an eye toward developing a show breed..



ASPECT
Although the distinctive feature of the American Curl is their uniquely curled ears, the medium-sized rectangular body, silky flat-lying coat, and expressive walnut-shaped eyes are equally indicative of the breed. They are available in both long and shorthair colour and pattern varieties, and since there is minimal undercoat, the Curl sheds little and requires hardly any grooming. When Curls are born, their ears are straight. In 3 to 5 days they start to curl back staying in a tight rosebud position, unfurling gradually until permanently ‘set' at around 16 weeks. This is the time breeders determine the kitten's ear quality as either pet or show in addition to the kitten's overall conformation.



CHARACTER
The Curl personality is truly unique .When introduced into a new home, Curl's seem to have an inherent respect for the current pet occupants, giving them plenty of room to adjust to the new kid on the block. Not overly talkative, the Curl's curiosity and intelligence is expressed through little trill-like cooing sounds. If not sleeping up high somewhere in a large salad bowl, figuring out with great determination just how to get into the shower with you, or assuming their spot right in front of a favourite TV show, they are patting at your glasses while you try to read the paper. Curls are very people-oriented, faithful, affectionate soulmates adjusting remarkably fast to other pets, children, and new situations



CARE
One will give it a bath / month.



BALINESE





ORIGIN
It is generally accepted that the breed originated as a spontaneous longhaired mutation of the Siamese cat. Apparently, Mother Nature decided that the already glorious Siamese could be made even more glorious by adding the long flowing coat to the svelte body lines of this graceful oriental beauty. Coat length is the only difference between the Siamese and the Balinese. Although it is probable that occasional longhaired kittens had been turning up in pedigreed Siamese litters long before they attracted the interest of a few imaginative breeders, no serious effort was made to promote the longhairs as a new breed until the 1940’s.



ASPECT
The breed standard of The C FA describes the Balinese as a svelte, dainty cat with long tapering lines, very lithe but muscular. Like its ancestor breed, the Siamese, nearly everything about the Balinese is long, including body, head, legs, and tail. It goes one step further than the Siamese in that its coat is also long. The most distinctive feature of the Balinese is its luxurious tail plume. Because the Balinese has a single coat, in contrast to the double coat of other longhairs, the hair lies close to the body, flowing naturally toward the rear. Thus, it does not detract from the long, slim, lines of the basic body structure. The only point colors recognized by CFA are the same colors recognized in the pedigreed Siamese : seal point, blue point, chocolate point and lilac point.



CHARACTER
Under that long, silky ermine coat he wears so proudly, this beautiful cat is all Siamese, and that includes his personality. Despite his regal bearing and aristocratic appearance, he is a clown with a heart as big as a circus tent. To gauge the level of his intelligence, you have only to gaze into those sapphire eyes which sparkle with alertness and healthy curiosity. Although he is every bit as demonstrative and affectionate as the Siamese, he is somewhat less vocal and his voice is softer.



CARE
Grooming is simple, for the coat does not mat like the double coat of most longhaired breeds.



BIRMAN





ORIGIN
The Birman cat is believed to have originated in Burma, where it was considered sacred, the companion cat of the Kittah priests. There is a legend as to how the Birmans developed the colors they are today: “Originally, the guardians of the Temple of LaoTsun were yellow-eyed white cats with long hair. The golden goddess of the temple, Tsun-Kyan-Kse, had deep blue eyes. The head priest, Mun-Ha, had as his companion a beautiful cat named Sinh. One day the temple was attacked and Mun-Ha was killed. At the moment of his death, Sinh placed his feet on his master and faced the goddess. The cat’s white fur took on a golden cast, his eyes turned as blue as the eyes of the goddess, and his face, legs and tail became the color of earth. However, his paws, where they touched the priest, remained white as a symbol of purity. All the other temple cats became similarly colored. Seven days later, Sinh died, taking the soul of Mun-Ha to paradise.”
The modern history of the Birman is almost as shrouded in mystery as its legendary origin. What is known for certain is that, probably around 1919, a pair of Birman cats were clandestinely shipped from Burma to France. The male cat did not survive the arduous conditions of the long voyage, but the female, Sita, did survive, and happily, was pregnant. From this small foundation the Birman was established in the western world. The French cat registry recognized the Birman as a separate breed in 1925. By the end of The Second World War, only two Birmans were left alive in Europe, and a program of outcrossing was necessary to reestablish the breed. Most cat registries require at least five generations of pure breeding after outcrossings to fully accredit a breed for championship competition. Birmans were recognized by England in 1966 and by The Cat Fanciers’ Association in 1967.




ASPECT
The ideal Birman is a large, long stocky cat. It has long silky hair, not as thick as that of the Persian, and is of a texture that doesn’t mat. The color of the coat is light, preferably with a golden cast, as if misted with gold. The “points” (face, legs and tail) are darker, similar to the Siamese and colorpointed Persian color patterns of seal point, blue point, chocolate point and lilac point. The almost round eyes are blue, set in a strong face with heavy jaws, full chin and Roman nose with nostrils set low. The very distinctive white feet are ideally symmetrical. The gloves on the front feet, if perfect, go across in an even line, and on the back feet end in a point up the back of the leg, called laces. It is very difficult to breed a cat with four perfect white gloves.



CHARACTER
The Birman personality is marvelous - gentle, active, playful, but quiet and unobtrusive if you are busy with other things.



CARE
One will give it a bath a month.



TIFFANY or CHANTILLY





ORIGIN
Research has revealed that English breeders had crossed Foreign Longhairs (Angoras), Abyssinians and Havana Browns in an attempt to recreate an Angora type cat. It is suspected, but can not be confirmed, that the Tiffany/Chantilly was a product of these efforts. In some places this breed is called the Chantilly/Tiffany. Either way it is the same breed. Their first breed name, "Tiffany", was chosen from the famous Tiffany Theater, who's name was connected with elegance during the Roaring "20's". the name was changed to "Chantilly" to preserve the connection with the "Tiffany" name and to avoid confusion with other breeds already using the word "Tiffany" as part of their breed names. The breed is now referred to by either name.



ASPECT
This is a semi-long haired cat of rich solid chocolate or agouti color, with a silky feel to its coat. Soft, smooth and lacking any undercoat makes the coat easy to groom. It has a glorious plumed tail, a neck ruff and ear furnishings that accent its striking, medium sized body. In the beginning, the breed only came in solid chocolate brown ;the breed, now, comes in solid black, cinnamon, blue, lilac and fawn. Their solid Chocolate color is rich with lightening occurring towards the underside. The neck ruff and ear furnishings are in lighter shades. Patterned colors include mackerel, ticked and spotted tabby. Eye color varies from Gold to deep yellow.



CHARACTER
This is a semi-long haired cat of rich solid chocolate or agouti color, with a silky feel to its coat. Soft, smooth and lacking any undercoat makes the coat easy to groom. It has a glorious plumed tail, a neck ruff and ear furnishings that accent its striking, medium sized body. In the beginning, the breed only came in solid chocolate brown ;the breed, now, comes in solid black, cinnamon, blue, lilac and fawn. Their solid Chocolate color is rich with lightening occurring towards the underside. The neck ruff and ear furnishings are in lighter shades. Patterned colors include mackerel, ticked and spotted tabby. Eye color varies from Gold to deep yellow.



CARE
Since the Chantilly/Tiffany is a "semi-longhair", this breed requires considerably less upkeep than some of the longhaired breeds such as the Persian; ears should be regularly checked for wax and correctly swabbed as necessary; a good grooming session per week is recommended.



CYMRIC





ORIGIN
The Cymric is like the Manx, a cat native to the isle of Manx, a cat without a tail, but with longhair (Manx cats often give birth to longhaired kittens). In 1960s, it was brought to Canada by breeders who decided to create a longheaded Manx breed. The breed was recognized by the CCA in 1970, by the CFA in 1989, but not by the FIFE. Cymric are almost unknown in Europe.



ASPECT
The Cymric is a short cat with well developed muzzle, moderate in length and width; it has a round appearance (head, eyes, muzzle, thigs , rump, feet). Its hind legs are longer than the forelegs; the feet have 5 toes in front and 4 in back; the eyes color is conformed to the coat. The Cymric has a abundant undercoat, of medium length, dense, silky. The colors accepted are the same as the Manx.



CHARACTER
The Cymric is friendly, affectionate, docile and active; it is playful and intelligent; it is also sociable and gets along well with the other pets.



CARE
The Cymric requires a weekly brushing.



JAPANESE BOBTAIL





ORIGIN
The Japanese Bobtail is a natural breed. From written records it seems certain that the domestic cat first arrived in Japan from China or Korea at least one thousand years ago. The Japanese Bobtail breed has certainly existed in Japan for many centuries; it is featured in many ancient prints and paintings.( a large painting from the 15th century hangs in the Freer Gallery of Art in the Smithsonian Institute in Washington DC, showing two lovely longhaired Japanese Bobtails). In 1968 the late Elizabeth Freret imported the first three Japanese Bobtails to the United States from Japan. In 1971 they were given provisional status in The Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) and were accepted for championship competition in 1976. In 1993 the longhair Japanese Bobtail was accepted by CFA for championship competition.



ASPECT
Japanese Bobtails are strong and healthy cats. Their coats are parted neatly down the back and their tails are large and plumey. The longhair Japanese Bobtail exhibits all the same characteristics as the shorthair Bobtail. They usually have litters of three to four kittens that are extremely large for newborns. Compared to other breeds, they are active earlier, walk earlier and start getting into trouble earlier. This breed has a low kitten mortality rate and high disease resistance. Kittens are never born tailless, nor are they born with full tails. The genetic factor which created the Japanese Bobtail is completely different from the Manx, a naturally tailless cat. Unlike the Manx, it is due to recessive genes and breeds true. The two breeds are not related in any way. Not only are their tails different, but the body types are completely opposite.Any color except the Siamese pattern or Abyssinian type agouti is permitted, the most popular colors are the mi-ke and those colors that can be used to create it: white, black, red, black and white, red and white, and tortoiseshell. Vividly contrasting colors and bold dramatic markings are preferred on the bi-colors.



CHARACTER
They like to carry things in their mouths, and most enjoy a good game of fetch. Masters of the pounce, these cats love to ride on shoulders. They are good travelers. They don’t panic at shows or strange hotel rooms, they adjust to dogs and other animals, and are especially good with children. They are active, intelligent, talkative cats. Their soft voices are capable of nearly a whole scale of tones; some people say they sing. Since they adore human companionship they almost always speak when spoken to.



CARE
One will give it a bath a month.



KURILIAN BOBTAIL





ORIGIN
This new breed is not well known out of its native territories. Though it is a Native to Japan with a long history on a chain of islands known as the Kurils, which runs from the easternmost point of Russia to the tip of Japan's Hokkaido Island.Also known as the Kuril Bobtail or the Curilsk Bobtail, because the Kuril Islands are Russian owned this breed is being developed and promoted as a Russian aboriginal breed that is completely separate and distinct from the Japanese Bobtail. It was adopted by the WCF in 1994.



ASPECT
The Kurilian Bobtail is a square-built, muscular, wild-looking cat; in its general appearance, the Kurilian is something like the Norwegian Forestcat, though its face has more resemblance to the Siberian, but Its head is shaped more triangularly than the Siberian with low cheekbones and a straight, broad, middle-long nose. Though they are both Native to Japan, the Kurilian and the Japanese Bobtail are quite different in both their body type and the nature of that natural bobbed tail. The Legs are middle long. The eyes are slightly slanted and almond shaped, but it does not have oriental features. Eye colors are conform to the color of the coat. Color yellow, green or yellow-green are prefered. They are Semi-Longhair and Shorthair kurilian. All colors without Colorpoint and solid are allowed. Part of the reason for its rarity is that there are just 2 or 3 kittens in a litter.



CHARACTER
In the wild, this cat is an excellent fisherman and hunter, which may explain why the Kuril loves to play in water! It is no problem for this cat to catch a 5 kg fish or a wild hare. People who live in Kunashir report that bear will run away from this cat. However, living with people, the breed has proven to be both peaceful and gentle, confining its hunting prowess to the pursuit of flies. The Kurilian's wild look is not reflected in the temperament of the breed. It is renowned for being both a clever and gentle clown. It has a great love for both human company and other species of pets, and it is perfectly happy living in an apartment in the city.



CARE
One will give it a bath / month..



MAINE COON





ORIGIN
Myths, legend and lore surround the Maine Coon Cat. Some are amusing, some are fantastic flights of fantasy and some are merely plausible. They certainly provide good material for conversation. Books and articles dealing with these aspects of the Maine Coon Cat have been well received as people never seem to tire of the subject and are always eager to know more about this wonderful breed. The Maine Coon is the native American longhaired cat and was recognized as a specific breed in Maine where they were held in high regard for their mousing talents.. The Maine Coon has always been admired for its beauty, and a Maine Coon was chosen Best Cat at the first major cat show ever held in this country. The transition from easygoing farm cat to CFA finalist was not an easy one, nor did it happen quickly. Although they lost favor and were conspicuously absent from shows for quite a long time, we are now seeing large classes of these beauties in most cat shows and it is not unusual for a Maine Coon to be named “Best Cat.”



ASPECT
It is a sturdy cat. It is the biggest cat of the world, it can weigh until 14 kg ; the dress is short on shoulders, long on the back and the sides. All the colours are admitted except chocolate-brown, lilac and colour not.



CHARACTER
The Maine Coon is well known for its loving nature, kindly disposition and great intelligence. MaineCoon are especially good with children and dogs and have always been a popular and sought after companion.



CARE
One will live it a bath a month.



MANDARIN (or Oriental Longhair)





ORIGIN
Due to its relation to the Balinese, it was originally called the Javanese. The CFA still uses this name for a few colors Balinese cats. The name “Mandarin “is only used in Holland, Germany, Belgium and France. In the United Kigdom, this pedigree is called “Angora” and the FIFe in America calls this breed “Javanese”. This semi-longhaired cat was obtained recently (by the seventy’s) by American breeders and developed by crossing Oriental Shorthairs and longhaired Siamese (Balinese). The Oriental Longhair received provisional recognition from the CFA, in 1994, TICA published a standard in 1998. This breed is still rare in Europe.



ASPECT
The Mandarin is of medium size, with a muscular body and thin long legs: it has the same structure as the Oriental Shorthair: large ears, vivid green and almond shaped. Eyes, long thin tail; its fine and silky coat is semi long. There are shorter hair on the tops of the shoulders and head; the colors of the Mandarin’s coat are the same that the Oriental Shorthair: blue, havanna chocolate, lavender or lilac, red, cream, white, and cinnamon (chocolate and lilac are the most desirable). All colors are in combination with silver.



CHARACTER
Mandarin cats are energic, sociable, affectionate, expecting a lot of human attention; they get along well with other cats; they are reserved with strangersand somewhat independent. They talk to us with their lovely loud voice.



CARE
They are easy to groom : brushing and combing several times per week.



NORWEGIAN FOREST CAT





ORIGIN
The skogkatt, meaning forest cat, really did come out of the Scandinavian forests some time in the last 4,000 years.These are the cats that explored the world with the Vikings, protecting the grain stores on land and sea, and which are believed to have left their progeny on the shores of North America as a legacy to the future. The Forest Cat was presented to the CFA Board for registration acceptance in February 1987, and in 1993, these wonderful works of art from nature were accepted for full championship status.



ASPECT
The tail is always magnificent, being as much as twelve inches or more when fanned to its fullest. Perhaps the most impressive part of the coat is the mane. On a fully mature cat, i.e. one over five years of age and which is challenged by the most adverse cold weather, the mane is nothing less than spectacular. It is long, dense and very, very impressive! This, unfortunately, may disappear in the spring, but rest assured that it will begin to lengthen again as the days begin to shorten. The Forest cat has bright emerald green eyes with a band of gold. They appear in coats of most colors, from pure white to deepest coal black, with every possible coat pattern and color combination in between, with the exception of the colorpoint colors as seen in the Siamese or Persian-Himalayan such as seal point or chocolate point. Darker cats require less coat to keep warm since they absorb more heat from the sun. Lighter cats tend to have fuller coats with more undercoat. Some colors change from light to darker tones with the seasons.



CHARACTER
Their personalities differ, depending upon the type home in which they spend their early kittenhood. As with any other breed, a kitten handled and petted by many loving people from birth and which has been exposed to children, cats and dogs will be different from one born and raised in an isolated area with limited human contact.



CARE
A question frequently asked is about the care the long coats require. As one breeder is fond of saying: “Mother Nature does not have hairdressers in the deep woods, so she did not design the cat to require the daily attention necessary to some other longhaired breeds.” Very little, if any, combing is required for non-show cats, but is recommended during spring shedding.



RAGDOLL





ORIGIN
Ragdolls were developed in the 1960’s by Ann Baker, a breeder in California. She bred Josephine, a loving, gentle, longhaired white female carrying Siamese markings, to other longhaired cats carrying Siamese markings. Her original stock consisted of sturdy, free-roaming cats. By selecting individuals with the look she wanted for her breeding program, she created the type standard for the Ragdoll.



ASPECT
Ragdolls are large, loving, laid-back longhairs with beautiful, big blue eyes. The body is light-colored, with darker Siamese-type points on the face, legs, tail and ears. In most patterns, the points are partly covered with white markings. The ideal Ragdoll is a well balanced cat, with no extreme features. Altered males may reach 20 pounds or more; females are proportionately smaller. Ragdolls are slow-maturing, reaching full coat color at two years, and full size and weight at four. There are four patterns: bi-color, van, mitted and pointed. Patterns come in eight colors: seal, blue, chocolate, lilac, red, cream, fawn and cinnamon. Points may be solid, lynx, or tortie. Pointed Ragdolls have the classic, Siamese-type markings. Mitteds look like they went wading in whipped cream and sneaked a sip: their chins are soft, fluffy white, and so are their mittens and boots. Bi- colors look like they went swimming in whipped cream and dunked their faces in for a deep drink Vans look like they nearly drowned in whipped cream. Only the top of the mask, ears, and tail, and perhaps a few spots on the body, show darker markings. CFA accepts bi-colors and vans for showing; mitteds and pointeds are registered.



CHARACTER
Ragdolls adore their humans. They run to greet you at the door, follow you from room to room, flop on you, sleep with you, and love you. They are gentle, carefully avoid scratching people, and are good with children, the elderly, and dogs. Ragdolls tend to be floor cats, not jumpers. They feel that humans prefer purrs to yowls, and keep their voices softly musical.



CARE
Proper maintenance requires a daily run-through with a metal comb to eliminate the potential drawbacks of tangles and hairballs. An occasional bath, attempted only after a complete comb-through and clipping of the nail tips, will keep the coat clean, healthy and beautiful.



RAGAMUFFIN





ORIGIN
The Ragamuffin is a direct descendant of Josephine, the original Rag-type cat. Ragamuffins are currently accepted for registration by UFO, ICE, and ACFA.



ASPECT
The Ragamuffin is very closely related to the Ragdoll : the Ragamuffin is a large cat with a soft, rabbit-like, medium to medium-long, mat-resisting coat. The head is a broad modified wedge with a rounded appearance. The eyes are very large and walnut-shaped which, coupled with a puffy whisker pad, gives the cat its distinctive sweet look. They are a slow maturing breed of cat. They don't reach full maturity until 3-4 years of age. Males generally weigh between 15 and 20 pounds, while the females range from 10 to 15 pounds. Ragamuffins are bred in all colors and patterns (Solids, Tabbies, Torties, Lynx, Mink, as well as blue-eyed pointed varieties).



CHARACTER
The Ragamuffin’s temperament and behaviour is like the Ragdoll : it is sweet and friendly. These cats get along well with children and other pets, and they love to be where the action is. Their docile nature makes them especially vulnerable to outside dangers : they don't possess the same defence instincts as most other cats do, so they must be kept inside and protected. They are usually pretty fearless when it comes to people or other animals.



CARE
The coat is low-maintenance compared to that of other longhaired breeds.



SOMALI





ORIGIN
The Somali is an Abyssin with long hairs.



ASPECT
It bears an uncanny resemblance to a little fox, with its large ears, masked face, full ruff and bushy tail. Somalis are well-proportioned, medium to large cats with firm muscular development. Their body is medium long and graceful, with a medium-length soft and silky coat that requires little grooming. The coat is usually one to three inches long, with shorter fur across the shoulders. The tail is fluffy and full; their feet have tufts between the toes. Their large, almond shaped eyes range in color from intense green to rich copper. The Somali has an agouti, or ticked, coat with four to twenty bands of color on each hair. The ticked fur mantles the cat with harmonizing solid color on its underside. They come in four recognized colors: ruddy, red, blue and fawn. Somalis have small litters of three to four kittens, which develop slowly. They reach their full size at about eighteen months of age.



CHARACTER
Somalis are intelligent cats, and while active, they have soft voices and are usually quiet. They communicate with human family members through soft mews and possess a charming trill. They are extroverts and very social. Possessed with a zest for life, they love to play, solicit nuzzles and pats, and thrive on human companionship. Many Somalis can manipulate faucets, and they love to play with water.



CARE
One will give it a bath/month.



TIFFANIE





ORIGIN
This purebred comes from the United Kingdom and is not to be mistaken for the North American Tiffany, which is different breed of cat. The Burmilla and the Tiffanie are members of what's called the Asian group that includes the Asian, Burmilla, Tiffanie and Bombay (significantly different from the breed of the same name in North America). The Tiffany are chocolate-colored cats that was bred in North America, in the late 1970's. They were originally called Foreign Longhair, and then their name was changed to Tiffany. With a different breed in Britain called Tiffanie the name was changed to Chantilly (or Chantilly/ Tiffany) to avoid confusion. The Tiffanie and its shorthaired version, the Burmilla, got their start in 1981 in London.
The Tiffanie is recognized by Britian's Governing Council of the Cat Fancy (GCCF);none of the Asian breeds are recognized by the North American cat associations, although fans do exist in this country.




ASPECT
Tiffianie cats are the only semi-long haired of the Asian breed; the Tiffanie is really a long-haired version of the Burmese. A striking cat with a silky semi-longhaired coat and a Burmese body and head type. These purebred are healthy and can live up to their late teens. The Tiffanie cats usually has about 6 pure bred kittens, but it is not uncommon for them to have more kittens.Though shaded silver is the best-known color, other colors and patterns are also available black, Chocolate, Red, Blue, Lilac, Cream, Caramel, Apricot ... The tabby and tortie patterns may be less distinct because of the semi-long hair. The Shaded Tiffanie is the semi longhaired version of the Burmilla.



CHARACTER
Tiffanie cats are affectionate, inquisitive, patient, playful .They love attention and need to be part of the family. They can be quite demanding and often follow their owners around the house crying for attention. They can be very sensitive to their owner's feelings and this makes them excellent companions. Their curiosity and friendliness can lead them to stray into visitor's cars or delivery vans and they may be best confined to the house or a secure garden.



CARE
Tiffanies are active cats and require 80 kcals per kg of bodyweight per day of food. These cats are not generally prone to obesity and regulate their own diets very well. They have no specific health care problems The semi-long haired Tiffanie does require some attention but not as much the full longhaired coats of the Persians : their silky coats need to be brushed daily and if showing a Tiffanie a bath may be necessary.



TURKISH ANGORA





ORIGIN
The Turkish Angora is a pure, natural breed of cat, originating probably from the Manul cat domesticated by the Tartars. They migrated eventually to Turkey, where they are regarded today with great reverence, as one of their national treasures. Many people have used the term Angora to signify any longhaired cat. However, the only pedigreed cats that carry the name "Angora" are the Turkish Angora. In the early part of this century, the Angora was used indiscriminately in breedings with Persians, finally disappearing from the scene as it became incorporated with that breed, known for a time simply as longhairs. In recent years, due to new importation from Turkey, the breed's country of origin, the Turkish Angora has again taken its place in the roster of the pedigreed cats of the world.



ASPECT
They are long, elegant, finely boned creatures with smoothly pointed faces. Turkish Angoras are now generally available in a full range of colors, having been accepted by CFA in any shade and pattern, except those that denote hybridization such as lavender, chocolate or the pointed pattern. They occur commonly, in most solids, tabbies, smokes and parti-colors. White is still the most popular color, though this is rapidly changing, as more and more breeders realize the beauty of this elegant breed in a variety of exciting shades.



CHARACTER
Turkish Angoras make wonderful pets. They are among the most intelligent of the cat breeds. They love their owners with a single minded devotion. who adore running and playing with wonderful grace and a great zest for living.



CARE
Their single, silky, medium length coats need only occasional grooming to look good.



TURKISH VAN





ORIGIN
The cat known in the United States as the Turkish Van is a rare and ancient breed that developed in central and southwest Asia, which today encompasses the countries of Iran, Iraq, southwest Soviet Union and eastern Turkey. “Van” is a common term in the region that has been given to a number of towns, villages and even a lake. They were first brought to England in 1955 as the Turkish cats, but this was later changed to Turkish Van to avoid confusion with the Turkish Angora. Although the breed has an ancient lineage, the Turkish Van is a relative newcomer to the United States, arriving in 1982. They are considered regional treasures in their homeland, and are not readily available for export to other countries. Even in areas where the breed has been known for centuries, they are still relatively rare. The breed was first brought into Europe from the Middle East by returning crusaders, and has been known by a variety of names over the centuries such as the white ringtail and the Russian longhair. A common misconception is that the Turkish Van is simply a color variation of the better known Turkish Angora. In reality, the Van and the Angora are distinct breeds that developed in geographically distant regions of Turkey. When seen together, the differences in type, size, boning and coat are readily apparent..



ASPECT
The coloration of the Turkish Van, which is considered by many to be the original breed to carry the piebald gene, calls for a white, semi-longhaired cat with colored markings restricted primarily to the head and tail. Other piebald cats that have been selectively bred for many generations to achieve similar markings are said to be “van-patterned” after the breed that originally sported it. The coat lacks an undercoat and has a very unique cashmere-like texture that makes it water-resistant.



CHARACTER
The Turkish Van takes three to five years to reach full maturity and is a large and agile cat of substantial strength. They are very intelligence as well as curious and make very rewarding companions in the right home. they love water and in their native region they have been termed “the Swimming Cats”.



CARE
The breed is a healthy one and the unique coat does not lend itself to matting, so they require little grooming.



Well this is all . If you want to see more differents breed go to the part 2 of this post Bye !